Saddletrout Studios
www.saddletrout.com

"Surreal Vegetation"

An exhibit of strange, yet to be discovered, plants




Chanter Plant
(Legume Symphonia)

The Chanter Plant (or Piper Bean) is a perennial characterized by a very large hollow bean structure and human-like appendages.

In late summer, the "bean" becomes an air-tight bladder. At about the same time, a stiff reed forms in the "chanter stalk". These changes enable the mature Chanter Plant to become musical.

The Chanter Plant uses a unique form of photosynthesis unlike other plants. It is able to produce very high levels of energy which it uses for long periods of music. Wide sturdy leaves allow this strange plant to collect large amounts of sunlight needed for its special photosynthesis.

Legend has it the wife of a musically challenged Scotsman buried her husband's pipes in a plot of enchanted ground, thus sowing the first Chanter Plant.




Wild Domicile Vine
(Labrusca Dominus)

This hardy ground vine produces a huge melon shaped structure which, on average, grows to be 30 feet high and 60 feet long. This large growth, which is not the plant's actual fruit, is not only hollow inside, but has natural windows and doorways.

This unusual characteristic of the Domicile Vine enables it to carry on a unique symbiotic relationship with oxygen breathing mammals. By providing a strong, comfortable, weather proof dwelling, the plant easily attracts inhabitants. Carbon dioxide exhaled by such inhabitants is used by the plant for its own respiration.

In contrast to its large size, the seeds of the Domicile Vine are microscopic. Each Fall they form a fine white powder on the interior walls and floor of the plant. This powder is picked up by the clothing, fur, or feat of the inhabitants living within the plant. Thus the seed is spread to other locations, enhancing propagation.




Please excuse our dust! We are still in the process of installing this exhibit.

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